Gnosis

Gnosis

AXIOM 21:"Succeed in not fearing the lion, and the lion will fear YOU. Say to suffering, 'I will that you shall become a pleasure,' and it will prove to be such-- and even more than a pleasure, it will be a blessing."
hierophage:

Lady Satan, Golden Age comic book heroine.
"Perhaps I am the only person in the world today who is a master of the art of Black Magic. That is why I am called Lady Satan."

hierophage:

Lady Satan, Golden Age comic book heroine.

"Perhaps I am the only person in the world today who is a master of the art of Black Magic. That is why I am called Lady Satan."

sagan-indiana:

God’s WhoresChildren of God/The Family International flirty fishing propaganda.

sagan-indiana:

God’s Whores
Children of God/The Family International flirty fishing propaganda.

Anonymous asked: Can you be Christian and a Wiccan?

scrollofthoth:

carpeumbra:

whoreofabaddon:

underthepleiades:

littledoomwitch:

nchnick:

littledoomwitch:

thepaganstudygrouppage:

While Catholicism and Wicca most likely don’t mix, Christian beliefs in the broader sense could be mixed somewhat with Outer Court Wicca. Depends on how you approach it. There are Christopagans, but I hear little of mixing Christianity and Wicca.

-Wrath

it still generally goes against the core beliefs of Christianity, because the whole point is to not hold anything above God. Christopagan, yes. Christowiccan, no. no matter how protestant or nondenominational that person is, it’s just not kosher.

Although Catholicism is basically Christian witchcraft

Eccchhhhh that is definitely not an apt descriptor, and if you went up to anyone in the Catholic clergy and said that, you’d get your ears boxed.

Wait…what? carpeumbra, whoreofabaddon

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Are you kidding me?

Catholicism is the original Christianity. It is not “Christianity plus Witchcraft.”

it is Christianity.

Period.

Read a damned book.

IMA NEED YOU TO BAAAAAAAAAAACK 

THE FUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUCK

UUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUPPPPPPPPP

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Catholicism is NOT “Christian Withcraft”. It is the faith of the One, Holy, Apostolic, Catholic Church that retains the rituals in light of Christ as dictated by Christ, the Apostles whom God loved, and some stuff from the Jews whom God loves. It is the original Church, built LITERALLY by Peter and ON TOP of Peter. 

How dare you reduce a nigh 2,000 year old faith into your New Age dribble.

Do as thou Wilt is the whole of the law.

Believe whatever you want.

And Carpe, is 1,500 years of Roman tyranny really worthy of such a defense?

Of course you can practise both of those traditions, any religious practices can be synthesised. Australian Indigenous spirituality has been known to be amalgamated with the beliefs imposed on the indigenous population by missionaries. 

Religious debates heat up so quickly (thanks fundamentals) so when discussing spiritual beliefs it’s really important to adhere to a phenomenological perspective, which means that you can analyse what a person is saying but you need to accept that whatever spiritual belief they are discussing is 100% true to them. So, yet another example of how you can practise both Christianity and Wicca.

And you cannot argue that Catholicism is the original Christianity for several reasons:

  1. The beliefs ‘inherent’ to Catholicism consistently change, as there is a fallible human leader of the faith who can determine doctrine.
  2. Why isn’t Protestantism the ‘original’ Christianity, after all, Protestantism puts its faith in the Bible itself, and not in newer texts of the Papacy.
  3. Don’t forget about the Eastern Orthodox church.

As far as religious discourse on the internet goes, this is well above “OMG GOD DOESN’T EXIST U FGGT!” “FUCK U HOMO” etc

Best Courtney Love Interview Ever!

jessicavalenti:

image

I just went through my old zines and found this: In 1993 (one year before Live Through This) Rollerderby interviewed Courtney Love with the intention of gabbing about clothes and instead got amazing rants about cheese and how her ex-boyfriends used to fart on her. I violated a few…

This whole interview is incredible. 

Courtney is one of the greatest figures of modern music. No one is as punx as her, she stands in the face of overwhelming adversity and just says ‘fuck you everyone.’

hierophage:

In celebration of the anniversary of the Greater Feast of St. +Swinburne. Hear thou, O saint of the true church of old time now essentially present, that of thee I claim heirship, with thee I claim communion, from thee I claim benediction in the name of IAO, whose glory and adoration thou did manifest unto men.  May thine Essence be here present, potent, puissant and paternal to perfect the feast within my heart, a joyous feast of Hadit’s rapture! AUMGN.
From the Invisible Basilica of Sabazius hosted by Hermetic. com

English lyric poet and critic; Crowley’s primary poetic influence. Viewed by many of his contemporary Victorians as blasphemous and depraved, Swinburne is now recognized as one of England’s greatest poets and critics, and as one of the greatest parodists of all time. His intoxicating poetry, whether in English, French, Latin or Greek, is characterized by aggressive alliteration, driving anapaestic rhythms, and a defiance of restraint and convention. His main themes are liberty, the relationship between pleasure and pain, and the psychology of sexual passion. He was pagan in his sympathies and fervently anti-theistic: “Thou hast conquered, O pale Galilean, the world has grown grey from thy breath” (from “Hymn to Proserpine”).
Swinburne was born into an aristocratic family. His father, being an officer in the British Navy, was frequently away from home, and his mother tended to be somewhat overprotective of her son. He seems to have had some sort of nervous disorder, possibly Tourette’s syndrome, which led to fits of trembling and outbursts of uncontrolled speech. He suffered through the demeaning discipline of Eton prior to proceeding to Oxford, where he met Dante Gabriel Rosetti and the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, and helped to form a club of political radicals and religious skeptics. He left Oxford before taking a degree, and moved to London where he was supported by his father in his literary pursuits. He was befriended by Sir Richard Burton and became, for a time, his protegé. Unfortunately, Burton innocently introduced him to brandy. He nearly died in 1879 from alcoholism. He was rescued by his friend Walter Theodore Watts, who took him in and encouraged him to devote himself to his true will as a poet, which he did; subsequently publishing 27 volumes, beginning with The Heptologia, and gradually attaining great esteem.
His major works include The Queen Mother and Rosamond (1860); Atalanta in Calydon (1865, an attempt to recreate, in English, the spirit and form of Greek Tragedy); Poems and Ballads (1866, vigorously attacked for its “immorality” and “feverish carnality”); Songs Before Sunrise (1871, dealing with political and religious liberty); Songs of Two Nations (1875); Erechthus (1876); Poems and Ballads, Second Series (1878); three plays about Mary Stuart: Chastelard (1865), Bothwell, a Tragedy (1874) and Mary Stuart, a Tragedy (1881); The Heptologia (1880); Tristram of Lyonesse (1882), A Century of Roundels (1883); Poems and Ballads, Third Series (1889); Astrophel (1894); A Tale of Balen (1896); A Channel Passage (1904); a novel, Love’s Cross-Currents (1904, previously serialized as “A Year’s Letters” in 1877); a fragment of a novel, Lesbia Brandon (posth. 1952); and many anonymous parodies, including a famous parody of his own poetic style, called “Nephelidia” (1880). He also wrote well-known critical studies of William Blake, Victor Hugo, Ben Johnson and William Shakespeare.
"Till the slow sea rise and the sheer cliff crumble, Till terrace and meadow the deep gulfs drink, Till the strength of the waves of the high tides humble The fields that lessen, the rocks that shrink, Here now in his triumph where all things falter, Stretched out on the spoils that his own hand spread, As a god self-slain on his own strange altar, Death lies dead." —from "A Forsaken Garden"
"His speech is a burning fire; With his lips he travaileth; In his heart is a blind desire, In his eyes foreknowledge of death; He weaves, and is clothed with derision; Sows, and he shall not reap; His life is a watch or a vision Between a sleep and a sleep." — from "Atalanta in Calydon"
"Life is the lust of a lamp for the light that is dark till the dawn of the day that we die." — from "Nephelidia"

hierophage:

In celebration of the anniversary of the Greater Feast of St. +Swinburne. Hear thou, O saint of the true church of old time now essentially present, that of thee I claim heirship, with thee I claim communion, from thee I claim benediction in the name of IAO, whose glory and adoration thou did manifest unto men.  May thine Essence be here present, potent, puissant and paternal to perfect the feast within my heart, a joyous feast of Hadit’s rapture! AUMGN.

From the Invisible Basilica of Sabazius hosted by Hermetic. com

English lyric poet and critic; Crowley’s primary poetic influence. Viewed by many of his contemporary Victorians as blasphemous and depraved, Swinburne is now recognized as one of England’s greatest poets and critics, and as one of the greatest parodists of all time. His intoxicating poetry, whether in English, French, Latin or Greek, is characterized by aggressive alliteration, driving anapaestic rhythms, and a defiance of restraint and convention. His main themes are liberty, the relationship between pleasure and pain, and the psychology of sexual passion. He was pagan in his sympathies and fervently anti-theistic: “Thou hast conquered, O pale Galilean, the world has grown grey from thy breath” (from “Hymn to Proserpine”).

Swinburne was born into an aristocratic family. His father, being an officer in the British Navy, was frequently away from home, and his mother tended to be somewhat overprotective of her son. He seems to have had some sort of nervous disorder, possibly Tourette’s syndrome, which led to fits of trembling and outbursts of uncontrolled speech. He suffered through the demeaning discipline of Eton prior to proceeding to Oxford, where he met Dante Gabriel Rosetti and the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, and helped to form a club of political radicals and religious skeptics. He left Oxford before taking a degree, and moved to London where he was supported by his father in his literary pursuits. He was befriended by Sir Richard Burton and became, for a time, his protegé. Unfortunately, Burton innocently introduced him to brandy. He nearly died in 1879 from alcoholism. He was rescued by his friend Walter Theodore Watts, who took him in and encouraged him to devote himself to his true will as a poet, which he did; subsequently publishing 27 volumes, beginning with The Heptologia, and gradually attaining great esteem.

His major works include The Queen Mother and Rosamond (1860); Atalanta in Calydon (1865, an attempt to recreate, in English, the spirit and form of Greek Tragedy); Poems and Ballads (1866, vigorously attacked for its “immorality” and “feverish carnality”); Songs Before Sunrise (1871, dealing with political and religious liberty); Songs of Two Nations (1875); Erechthus (1876); Poems and Ballads, Second Series (1878); three plays about Mary Stuart: Chastelard (1865), Bothwell, a Tragedy (1874) and Mary Stuart, a Tragedy (1881); The Heptologia (1880); Tristram of Lyonesse (1882), A Century of Roundels (1883); Poems and Ballads, Third Series (1889); Astrophel (1894); A Tale of Balen (1896); A Channel Passage (1904); a novel, Love’s Cross-Currents (1904, previously serialized as “A Year’s Letters” in 1877); a fragment of a novel, Lesbia Brandon (posth. 1952); and many anonymous parodies, including a famous parody of his own poetic style, called “Nephelidia” (1880). He also wrote well-known critical studies of William Blake, Victor Hugo, Ben Johnson and William Shakespeare.

"Till the slow sea rise and the sheer cliff crumble, Till terrace and meadow the deep gulfs drink, Till the strength of the waves of the high tides humble The fields that lessen, the rocks that shrink, Here now in his triumph where all things falter, Stretched out on the spoils that his own hand spread, As a god self-slain on his own strange altar, Death lies dead." —from "A Forsaken Garden"

"His speech is a burning fire; With his lips he travaileth; In his heart is a blind desire, In his eyes foreknowledge of death; He weaves, and is clothed with derision; Sows, and he shall not reap; His life is a watch or a vision Between a sleep and a sleep." — from "Atalanta in Calydon"

"Life is the lust of a lamp for the light that is dark till the dawn of the day that we die." — from "Nephelidia"

The Arcanes du Tarot kabbalistique, Oswald Wirth’s tarot, created in 1889 (influenced by the teachings of Stanislas de Guaita!). It is comprised of only twenty-two major arcana.

The Arcanes du Tarot kabbalistiqueOswald Wirth’s tarot, created in 1889 (influenced by the teachings of Stanislas de Guaita!). It is comprised of only twenty-two major arcana.

art-of-swords:

Saber with Scabbard

  • Dated: 19th century
  • Culture: Turkish
  • Medium: steel, gold, gilt brass, diamonds, emeralds, pearls
  • Measurements: overall length 39 3/4 inches (100.97 cm)
  • Provenance: Sultan Murad V

The most important ceremony in the inauguration of many Islamic rulers was the investiture with a sword, rather than a crown. This extravagantly decorated saber traditionally is said to have been refitted in 1876 for the investiture of the Ottoman sultan Murad V (reigned May 30–August 31, 1876).

He suffered a nervous breakdown before the ceremony and subsequently was deposed and kept a prisoner until his death in 1904. The sword was probably assembled by a court jeweler, using a seventeenth-century Iranian blade, an eighteenth-century Indian jade grip, and gem-studded gold and gilt-brass mounts of contemporary workmanship.

The emerald near the top of the scabbard opens to reveal a secret compartment containing a gold coin marked with the name of Süleyman the Magnificent (1494–1566), the most powerful Ottoman ruler of the sixteenth century. The underside of the emerald is inscribed with the phrase “According to God’s will.”

Source: Copyright 2014 © The Metropolitan Museum of Art