Gnosis

Gnosis

AXIOM 21:"Succeed in not fearing the lion, and the lion will fear YOU. Say to suffering, 'I will that you shall become a pleasure,' and it will prove to be such-- and even more than a pleasure, it will be a blessing."
The manananggal is a mythical creature of the Philippines, an evil, man-eating and blood-sucking monster or witch.

The manananggal is a mythical creature of the Philippines, an evil, man-eating and blood-sucking monster or witch.

Count Dracula as portrayed by Béla Lugosi in 1931’s Dracula

Count Dracula as portrayed by Béla Lugosi in 1931’s Dracula

“The Vampire”, lithograph by R. de Moraine (1864).

“The Vampire”, lithograph by R. de Moraine (1864).

An image from Max Ernst’s Une Semaine de Bonté

An image from Max Ernst’s Une Semaine de Bonté

Neil Gaiman’s Sandman

Neil Gaiman’s Sandman

Prince Hanzoku terrorized by a nine-tailed fox. Print by Utagawa Kuniyoshi, 19th century.

Prince Hanzoku terrorized by a nine-tailed fox. Print by Utagawa Kuniyoshi, 19th century.

Lilith (1892) by John Collier in Southport Atkinson Art Gallery

Lilith (1892) by John Collier in Southport Atkinson Art Gallery

Burney Relief, Babylon (1800-1750 BCE). The figure in the relief was sometimes identified with Lilith, based on a misreading of an outdated translation of the Epic of Gilgamesh. Modern research has identified the figure as either Ishtar or Ereshkigal.

Burney Relief, Babylon (1800-1750 BCE). The figure in the relief was sometimes identified with Lilith, based on a misreading of an outdated translation of the Epic of Gilgamesh. Modern research has identified the figure as either Ishtar or Ereshkigal.

Roman mosaic: Odysseus and the Sirens 

Roman mosaic: Odysseus and the Sirens 

Flight of King Gradlon, by E. V. Luminais, 1884. Ys is a mythical city that was built on the coast of Brittany and later swallowed by the ocean. Most versions of the legend place the city in the Douarnenez Bay.

Flight of King Gradlon, by E. V. Luminais, 1884. 
Ys is a mythical city that was built on the coast of Brittany and later swallowed by the ocean. Most versions of the legend place the city in the Douarnenez Bay.

Arctic continent on the Gerardus Mercator map of 1595.In Greek mythology the Hyperboreans were mythical people who lived “beyond the North Wind”. The Greeks thought that Boreas, the god of the North Wind (one of the Anemoi, or “Winds”) lived in Thrace, and therefore Hyperborea indicates a region that lay far to the north of Thrace. This land was supposed to be perfect, with the sun shining twenty-four hours a day, which to modern ears suggests a possible location within the Arctic Circle. However, it is also possible that Hyperborea had no real physical location at all, for according to the classical Greek poet Pindar, 

neither by ship nor on foot would you find the marvellous road to the assembly of the Hyperboreans.

Arctic continent on the Gerardus Mercator map of 1595.

In Greek mythology the Hyperboreans were mythical people who lived “beyond the North Wind”. The Greeks thought that Boreas, the god of the North Wind (one of the Anemoi, or “Winds”) lived in Thrace, and therefore Hyperborea indicates a region that lay far to the north of Thrace. This land was supposed to be perfect, with the sun shining twenty-four hours a day, which to modern ears suggests a possible location within the Arctic Circle. However, it is also possible that Hyperborea had no real physical location at all, for according to the classical Greek poet Pindar,

neither by ship nor on foot would you find the marvellous road to the assembly of the Hyperboreans.

Ramesses II, painted relief

Ramesses II, painted relief

Athanasius Kircher’s map of Atlantis, in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean. From Mundus Subterraneus 1669, published in Amsterdam. The map is oriented with south at the top.

Athanasius Kircher’s map of Atlantis, in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean. From Mundus Subterraneus 1669, published in Amsterdam. The map is oriented with south at the top.

congenitaldisease:

In the final years of the 1960s, five people were randomly selected and murdered by an unknown killer in San Francisco. The killer called himself ‘Zodiac’ and taunted the police for years with letters that mocked their failure to capture him. Although the murders ceased in 1969, the unknown killer stayed in communication with the media and the San Francisco police department - even sending them a Halloween card - for the next decade. Despite claiming responsibility for as many as 37 deaths (the official number is 5) the Zodiac Killer was never captured.

(via wednesdaysnecropolis)