Gnosis | Chir batti (ghost-light), also spelled chhir batti...

Gnosis

AXIOM 21:"Succeed in not fearing the lion, and the lion will fear YOU. Say to suffering, 'I will that you shall become a pleasure,' and it will prove to be such-- and even more than a pleasure, it will be a blessing."
Chir batti (ghost-light), also spelled chhir batti or cheer batti, is a yet unexplained strange dancing light phenomena occurring on dark nights reported from the Banni grasslands, its seasonal marshy wetlands[13] and the adjoining desert of the marshy salt flats of the Rann of Kutch[14] near Indo-Pakistani border in Kutch district, Gujarat State, India. Local villagers have been seeing these sometimes hovering, sometimes flying balls of lights since time immemorial, and call it Chir Batti in their Kutchhi–Sindhi language, with Chir meaning ghost and Batti meaning light.[13]

One Asian theologist ponders the relation of will-o’-the-wisp to that of the foxfire produced by kitsune, an interesting way of combining mythology of the West with that of the East.[15]
Similar phenomena are described in Japanese folklore, including Hitodama (literally “Human Soul” as a ball of energy), Hi no Tama (Ball of Flame), Aburagae, Koemonbi, Ushionibi, etc. All these phenomena are described as balls of flame or light, at times associated with graveyards, but occurring across Japan as a whole in a wide variety of situations and locations. These phenomena are described in Shigeru Mizuki's 1985 book Graphic World of Japanese Phantoms (妖怪伝 in Japanese).

Chir batti (ghost-light), also spelled chhir batti or cheer batti, is a yet unexplained strange dancing light phenomena occurring on dark nights reported from the Banni grasslands, its seasonal marshy wetlands[13] and the adjoining desert of the marshy salt flats of the Rann of Kutch[14] near Indo-Pakistani border in Kutch district, Gujarat State, India. Local villagers have been seeing these sometimes hovering, sometimes flying balls of lights since time immemorial, and call it Chir Batti in their KutchhiSindhi language, with Chir meaning ghost and Batti meaning light.[13]

One Asian theologist ponders the relation of will-o’-the-wisp to that of the foxfire produced by kitsune, an interesting way of combining mythology of the West with that of the East.[15]

Similar phenomena are described in Japanese folklore, including Hitodama (literally “Human Soul” as a ball of energy), Hi no Tama (Ball of Flame), Aburagae, Koemonbi, Ushionibi, etc. All these phenomena are described as balls of flame or light, at times associated with graveyards, but occurring across Japan as a whole in a wide variety of situations and locations. These phenomena are described in Shigeru Mizuki's 1985 book Graphic World of Japanese Phantoms (妖怪伝 in Japanese).

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